Videos on the topic of astronomy




Louis Balestin
MONDES

esa

The European Space Agency (ESA) is Europe‚€ôs gateway to space.
  • Earth from Space: Sagaing Division, Myanmar

    2017-10-19 08:58:33Earth from Space: Sagaing Division, Myanmar

    Earth from Space is presented by Kelsea Brennan-Wessels from the ESA Web-TV virtual studios. Sentinel-1 offers us radar vision during a period of severe flooding in Myanmar, in the 244th  edition.

    See also http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2017/10/Sagaing_Division_Myanmar to download the image.

  • Launching satellites from Space Station ‚€ď step one

    2017-01-25 13:32:04Launching satellites from Space Station ‚€ď step one

    ESA astronaut Thomas Pesquet working in the Kibo laboratory to prepare a CubeSat launch ‚€ď at 30 times increased speed.

    The cylinder in the back is the mini-airlock that allows objects to be sent outside the Space Station. First Thomas and NASA astronaut Shane Kimbrough retrieved the Robotics External Leak Locator and wrapped it up for storage.

    Afterwards Thomas installs the platform that the robotic arm grabs. The pointy bit is the connector for the robotic arm.
    This video was recorded in December 2016 and was the first step for launching the CubeSats on 16 January 2017. Later Thomas put the satellite launcher on the platform and a third step is to connect the satellites themselves.

    Thomas is spending six months on the International Space Station as part of his Proxima mission. During Proxima, Thomas will perform around 50 scientific experiments for ESA and France‚€ôs space agency CNES as well as take part in many research activities for the other Station partners. The mission is part of ESA‚€ôs vision to use Earth-orbiting spacecraft as a place to live and work for the benefit of European society while using the experience to prepare for future voyages of exploration further into the Solar System.

    Connect with Thomas Pesquet: http://thomaspesquet.esa.int

  • Spacewalker‚€ôs view

    2017-01-25 13:30:38Spacewalker‚€ôs view

    ESA astronaut Thomas Pesquet completed his first spacewalk 13 January 2017 together with NASA astronaut Shane Kimbrough to complete a battery upgrade to the outpost‚€ôs power system.

    Thomas recorded the spacewalk for the first time with a camera in a space-proof casing that was mounted to a bracket on his chest called the mini work station. This video shows scenes from the spacewalk using this camera.

    The spacewalk went as planned and, even better, Shane and Thomas performed a number of extra tasks once they had installed the batteries. They retrieved a failed camera, installed a protective cover on an unused docking port, moved handrails in preparation for future spacewalks and took pictures of external facilities for ground control.

    The duo spent five hours and 58 minutes outside the International Space Station.

    Thomas is spending six months on the International Space Station as part of his Proxima mission. During Proxima, Thomas will perform around 50 scientific experiments for ESA and France‚€ôs space agency CNES as well as take part in many research activities for the other Station partners. The mission is part of ESA‚€ôs vision to use Earth-orbiting spacecraft as a place to live and work for the benefit of European society while using the experience to prepare for future voyages of exploration further into the Solar System.

  • Launching satellites from Space Station ‚€ď step two

    2017-01-25 13:29:35Launching satellites from Space Station ‚€ď step two

    ESA astronaut Thomas Pesquet working in the Kibo laboratory to prepare a CubeSat launch ‚€ď at 30 times increased speed.

    This follows a previous video to prepare for the launch the CubeSats on 16 January 2017. Thomas is installing the deployment system, the last step before the International Space Station's Japanese robotic arm takes over.

    The cylinder in the back is the mini-airlock that allows objects to be sent outside the Space Station. The CubeSats are on the slide table in four blocks. Thomas protects the airlock ring and works to hook up the satellites and protect them. He holds up a blue label to show ground control that it has been removed as planned. The video was recorded live so some parts of the video are missing due to the regular loss of signal when the International Space Station loses line of sight with its communication satellite.

    Thomas is spending six months on the International Space Station as part of his Proxima mission. During Proxima, Thomas will perform around 50 scientific experiments for ESA and France‚€ôs space agency CNES as well as take part in many research activities for the other Station partners. The mission is part of ESA‚€ôs vision to use Earth-orbiting spacecraft as a place to live and work for the benefit of European society while using the experience to prepare for future voyages of exploration further into the Solar System.

    Connect with Thomas Pesquet: http://thomaspesquet.esa.int

    Music: Heavenly Embrace 5 - Marc Jackson Burrows from Audio Network

  • Introducing ESA‚€ôs new astronaut Matthias Maurer

    2017-01-24 17:20:01Introducing ESA‚€ôs new astronaut Matthias Maurer

    Media are invited to ESOC, ESA‚€ôs space operations centre in Darmstadt, Germany, for a press conference on 2 February 2017 at 10:00 CET with ESA‚€ôs latest recruit to the astronaut corps, Matthias Maurer.

    Call for media: Introducing ESA's new astronaut:
    http://www.esa.int/For_Media/Press_Releases/Call_for_Media_Introducing_ESA_s_new_astronaut

  • Ariane 6

    2017-01-23 15:32:15Ariane 6

    Decided in Luxemburg by the European Space Agency council meeting at Ministerial level, Ariane 6 is a modular three-stage launcher (solid‚€ďcryogenic‚€ďcryogenic) with two configurations using: four boosters (A64) or two boosters (A62).

    More about Ariane 6:
    http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Launchers/Launch_vehicles/Ariane_6

    Credit: ESA-David Ducros

  • Space Station Moon

    2017-01-19 16:01:26Space Station Moon

    Is it a bird? Is it a plane? No, it is the International Space Station as it flies in front of the Moon as seen from ESA‚€ôs space science centre near Madrid, Spain, on 14 January.

    A full Moon, looking up at the right time and good weather are necessary to take a sequence like this. Consisting of 13 superimposed images, it clearly shows the Station‚€ôs main elements.Thirteen frames were captured starting at 01:01:14 GMT, with the Station taking just half a second to cross the Moon.

    The outpost is the largest structure in orbit, spanning the size of a football pitch, but at 400 km altitude it still appears tiny through a telescope.Michel Breitfellner, Manuel Castillo, Abel de Burgos and Miguel Perez Ayucar work at ESA‚€ôs European Space Astronomy Centre and are members its astronomy club. They braved freezing temperatures to set up two telescopes with reflex cameras to record this sequence.

    As the Station could be seen only when in front of the Moon, the group had to press the shutter and hope for the best. Their calculations were perfect and the result speaks for itself.

  • Earth from Space: Big Island, Hawaii

    2017-01-19 15:30:36Earth from Space: Big Island, Hawaii

    Earth from Space is presented by Kelsea Brennan-Wessels from the ESA Web-TV virtual studios. Explore Hawaii's largest island in the 213th edition.

    See also http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2017/01/Big_Island_Hawaii to download the image.

  • Paxi - Day, night, and the seasons

    2017-01-16 17:20:23Paxi - Day, night, and the seasons

    Join Paxi as he explores why we have day and night, and learn why the Earth has seasons.

    More about Paxi:
    http://www.esa.int/paxi/

  • Another Space

    2017-01-02 15:33:31Another Space

    Follow this truly international team of astronaut explorers deep under the surface during their ESA #CAVES2016 scientific expedition.

    NASA's Jessica Meir and Ricky Arnold, ESA's Pedro Duque, JAXA's Aki Hoshide, Roskosmos's Sergei Korsakov and CNSA's Ye Guangfu. ESA is preparing astronauts from all space agencies to become effective space explorers, taking them in expeditions in one of the last frontiers of exploration on Earth: its subsurface.

    CAVES, ESA's unique training programme for astronauts, takes place over a couple of weeks in Sardinia's Supramonte. Six astronauts spend two weeks deep in caves, in the dark and cold. They are separated from the outside world, doing scientific research and daily tasks together, as a group, just like in space. Moving in the cave system is also comparable to spacewalking with the use of harnesses and safety devices.

    Read more about CAVES (Cooperative Adventure for Valuing and Exercising human behaviour and performance Skills) on our dedicated website (http://www.esa.int/caves) and read more about the CAVES 2016 campaign in the blog (http://blogs.esa.int/caves).

  • Faites voyager vos histoires dans l'espace

    2017-01-02 14:36:13Faites voyager vos histoires dans l'espace

    L‚€ôastronaute fran√ßais de l‚€ôAgence spatiale europ√©enne (ESA) Thomas Pesquet a annonc√© le th√®me du premier concours d‚€ô√©criture depuis la Station spatiale internationale. Le concours, en langue fran√ßaise, s‚€ôadresse aux jeunes jusqu‚€ô√† 25 ans. Les textes peuvent √™tre soumis jusqu‚€ôau 28 f√©vrier 2017 et les r√©sultats seront annonc√©s depuis la Station spatiale internationale le 6 avril 2017.

    ¬ę Il y a dans le m√©tier d‚€ôastronaute, comme dans le m√©tier de pilote, une forte composante technique. Mais il y a aussi une part de r√™ve et de po√©sie. ¬Ľ

    Thomas Pesquet, a emport√© avec lui pour la mission Proxima les Ňíuvres compl√®tes d‚€ôAntoine de Saint-Exup√©ry. Dans Le Petit Prince le h√©ros d√©couvre 7 plan√®tes et 7 habitants, l‚€ôastronaute invite les participants au concours d‚€ô√©criture √† imaginer une huiti√®me plan√®te et son habitant.

    Intitul√© ¬ę Faites voyager vos histoires dans l‚€ôespace ¬Ľ, ce concours d‚€ô√©criture est n√© d‚€ôun partenariat entre l‚€ôassociation le Labo des histoires, la Fondation Antoine de Saint-Exup√©ry pour la Jeunesse, l‚€ôAgence spatiale europ√©enne, la Cit√© de l‚€ôespace et l‚€ôInstitut fran√ßais. Il est plac√© sous le Haut-patronage de la Secr√©taire g√©n√©rale de la Francophonie, Micha√ęlle Jean.

    Enfants, adolescents et jeunes adultes jusqu‚€ô√† 25 ans peuvent participer √† ce concours en langue fran√ßaise qui est ouvert √† tous et comporte deux cat√©gories : ¬ę France ¬Ľ et ¬ę International ¬Ľ. Des activit√©s port√©es par les partenaires du concours seront organis√©es dans les prochains mois, donnant vie au concours tout en sensibilisant les jeunes √©crivains √† l‚€ôespace et √† l‚€ôŇďuvre d‚€ôAntoine de Saint-Exup√©ry.

    Les participants ont jusqu‚€ôau 28 f√©vrier 2017 pour imaginer, √©crire et soumettre leur texte. Un jury compos√© de personnalit√©s de l‚€ôa√©rospatiale, de l‚€ôa√©ronautique et de la litt√©rature se r√©unira ensuite pour s√©lectionner les cinq textes laur√©ats de chaque cat√©gorie.

    Thomas Pesquet d√©voilera le 6 avril 2017, depuis la Station spatiale internationale, les extraits de ses deux ¬ę Grand prix ¬Ľ (cat√©gorie France et cat√©gorie Internationale). A l‚€ôautomne prochain, les dix laur√©ats seront invit√©s en Europe pour un s√©jour sur le th√®me de l‚€ôespace et de la litt√©rature.


    Lien vers la plateforme du concours http://www.missionproxima.com/concours-ecriture

  • The amazing adventures of Rosetta and Philae (Italian)

    2016-12-31 19:51:08The amazing adventures of Rosetta and Philae (Italian)

    Watch the amazing cartoon adventures of Rosetta and Philae, now back-to-back in one special feature-length production.

    Find out how Rosetta and Philae first got inspired to visit a comet, and follow them on their incredible ten-year journey through the Solar System to their destination, flying around planets and past asteroids along the way. Watch as Philae tries to land on the comet and deals with some unexpected challenges!

    Learn about the fascinating observations that Rosetta made as she watched the comet change before her eyes as they got closer to the Sun and then further away again. Finally, wish Rosetta farewell, as she, too, finishes her amazing adventure on the surface of the comet. Keep watching for one last surprise!

  • The amazing adventures of Rosetta and Philae (Spanish)

    2016-12-31 19:50:54The amazing adventures of Rosetta and Philae (Spanish)

    Watch the amazing cartoon adventures of Rosetta and Philae, now back-to-back in one special feature-length production.

    Find out how Rosetta and Philae first got inspired to visit a comet, and follow them on their incredible ten-year journey through the Solar System to their destination, flying around planets and past asteroids along the way. Watch as Philae tries to land on the comet and deals with some unexpected challenges!

    Learn about the fascinating observations that Rosetta made as she watched the comet change before her eyes as they got closer to the Sun and then further away again. Finally, wish Rosetta farewell, as she, too, finishes her amazing adventure on the surface of the comet. Keep watching for one last surprise!

  • The amazing adventures of Rosetta and Philae (German)

    2016-12-31 19:49:54The amazing adventures of Rosetta and Philae (German)

    Watch the amazing cartoon adventures of Rosetta and Philae, now back-to-back in one special feature-length production.

    Find out how Rosetta and Philae first got inspired to visit a comet, and follow them on their incredible ten-year journey through the Solar System to their destination, flying around planets and past asteroids along the way. Watch as Philae tries to land on the comet and deals with some unexpected challenges!

    Learn about the fascinating observations that Rosetta made as she watched the comet change before her eyes as they got closer to the Sun and then further away again. Finally, wish Rosetta farewell, as she, too, finishes her amazing adventure on the surface of the comet. Keep watching for one last surprise!

  • The amazing adventures of Rosetta and Philae

    2016-12-31 19:47:49The amazing adventures of Rosetta and Philae

    Watch the amazing cartoon adventures of Rosetta and Philae, now back-to-back in one special feature-length production.

    Find out how Rosetta and Philae first got inspired to visit a comet, and follow them on their incredible ten-year journey through the Solar System to their destination, flying around planets and past asteroids along the way. Watch as Philae tries to land on the comet and deals with some unexpected challenges!

    Learn about the fascinating observations that Rosetta made as she watched the comet change before her eyes as they got closer to the Sun and then further away again. Finally, wish Rosetta farewell, as she, too, finishes her amazing adventure on the surface of the comet. Keep watching for one last surprise!

  • The amazing adventures of Rosetta and Philae (French)

    2016-12-31 19:46:14The amazing adventures of Rosetta and Philae (French)

    Watch the amazing cartoon adventures of Rosetta and Philae, now back-to-back in one special feature-length production.

    Find out how Rosetta and Philae first got inspired to visit a comet, and follow them on their incredible ten-year journey through the Solar System to their destination, flying around planets and past asteroids along the way. Watch as Philae tries to land on the comet and deals with some unexpected challenges!

    Learn about the fascinating observations that Rosetta made as she watched the comet change before her eyes as they got closer to the Sun and then further away again. Finally, wish Rosetta farewell, as she, too, finishes her amazing adventure on the surface of the comet. Keep watching for one last surprise!

  • Rosetta‚€ôs complete journey around the comet

    2016-12-22 15:48:14Rosetta‚€ôs complete journey around the comet

    Animation visualising Rosetta‚€ôs trajectory around Comet 67P/Churyumov‚€ďGerasimenko, from arrival to mission end.

    The animation begins on 31 July 2014, during Rosetta‚€ôs final approach to the comet after its ten-year journey through space. The spacecraft arrived at a distance of 100 km on 6 August, from where it gradually approached the comet and entered initial mapping orbits that were needed to select a landing site for Philae. These observations also enabled the first comet science of the mission.The manoeuvres in the lead up to, during and after Philae‚€ôs release on 12 November are seen, before Rosetta settled into longer-term science orbits.

    In February and March 2015 the spacecraft made several flybys. One of the closest triggered a ‚€ėsafe mode‚€ô that forced it to retreat temporarily until it was safe to draw gradually closer again.

    The comet‚€ôs increased activity in the lead up to and after perihelion in August 2015 meant that Rosetta remained well beyond 100 km for several months.In June 2015, contact was restored with Philae again ‚€ď albeit temporary, with no permanent link able to be maintained, despite a series of dedicated trajectories flown by Rosetta for several weeks.

    Following the closest approach to the Sun, Rosetta made a dayside far excursion some 1500 km from the comet, before re-approaching to closer orbits again, enabled by the reduction in the comet‚€ôs activity.

    In March‚€ďApril 2016 Rosetta went on another far excursion, this time on the night side, followed by a close flyby and orbits dedicated to a range of science observations.

    In early August the spacecraft started flying elliptical orbits that brought it progressively closer to the comet. On 24 September Rosetta left its close, flyover orbits and switched into the start of a 16 x 23 km orbit that was used to prepare and line up for the final descent.

    On the evening of 29 September Rosetta manoeuvred onto a collision course with the comet, beginning the final, slow descent from an altitude of 19 km. It collected scientific data throughout the descent and gently struck the surface at 10:39 GMT on 30 September in the Ma‚€ôat region on the comet‚€ôs ‚€ėhead‚€ô, concluding the mission.

    The trajectory shown in this animation is created from real data, but the comet rotation is not. Distances are given with respect to the comet centre (except for the zero at the end to indicate completion), but may not necessarily follow the exact comet distance because of natural deviations from the comet‚€ôs gravity and outgassing. An arrow indicates the direction to the Sun as the camera viewpoint changes during the animation.

    More about the Rosetta mission:
    http://rosetta.esa.int

  • Earth from Space: China‚€ôs Tian Shan mountains

    2016-12-22 10:59:53Earth from Space: China‚€ôs Tian Shan mountains

    Earth from Space is presented by Kelsea Brennan-Wessels from the ESA Web-TV virtual studios. Take a tour with Sentinel-2 to the Tian Shan mountains in China in the 211th edition.

    See also http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2016/12/China_s_Tian_Shan_mountains to download the image.

  • Eric Wille: Catching X-rays in stacked silicon

    2016-12-21 14:59:00Eric Wille: Catching X-rays in stacked silicon

    ESA optics engineer Eric Wille explains the origin of silicon pore optics, the new optical technology underpinning Europe‚€ôs Athena space observatory to observe the hot, high-energy cosmos.

    Polishing and stacking together silicon wafers ‚€ď normally used to manufacture integrated circuits ‚€ď allows the focusing of X-rays to see far further into space. ESA shares the patent for this technology with Cosine Research, the Dutch company currently developing it.

    The mission launch is 12 years away, but work von preparing its silicon pore optics module is already well underway.

    Find out more:
    http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Engineering_Technology/Talking_technology/Catching_X-rays_in_stacked_silicon

    More Talking Technology:
    http://www.esa.int/talkingtechnology

  • Thomas Pesquet and Expedition 50 space Christmas message

    2016-12-20 16:45:10Thomas Pesquet and Expedition 50 space Christmas message

    ESA astronaut Thomas Pesquet shares his Christmas plans and wishes on the International Space Station with Expedition 50 crewmates Shane Kimbrough and Peggy Whitson.

    Flying 400 km above Earth, astronauts on the International Space Station have a unique experience and vision of our planet that they share in this video. Thomas recounts his memories growing up in Normany, France, and explains what Christmas means to him.

    His end-of-year meal was prepared by French chefs ‚€ď canned of course, there is no way to cook food on the Space Station and includes ox-tongue from his home-region prepared by Thierry Marx, chicken-supreme and for desert, apple gingerbread.

    Connect with Thomas Pesquet on social media:
    http://thomaspesquet.esa.int

  • (French) Thomas Pesquet's space Christmas message

    2016-12-20 16:43:07(French) Thomas Pesquet's space Christmas message

    ESA astronaut Thomas Pesquet shares his Christmas plans and wishes on the International Space Station.

    Flying 400 km above Earth, astronauts on the International Space Station have a unique experience and vision of our planet that they share in this video. Thomas recounts his memories growing up in Normany, France, and explains what Christmas means to him.

    His end-of-year meal was prepared by French chefs ‚€ď canned of course, there is no way to cook food on the Space Station and includes ox-tongue from his home-region prepared by Thierry Marx, chicken-supreme and for desert, apple gingerbread.

    Connect with Thomas Pesquet on social media:
    http://thomaspesquet.esa.int

  • Thomas Pesquet's space Christmas message

    2016-12-20 16:43:00Thomas Pesquet's space Christmas message

    ESA astronaut Thomas Pesquet shares his Christmas plans and wishes on the International Space Station.

    Flying 400 km above Earth, astronauts on the International Space Station have a unique experience and vision of our planet that they share in this video. Thomas recounts his memories growing up in Normany, France, and explains what Christmas means to him.

    His end-of-year meal was prepared by French chefs ‚€ď canned of course, there is no way to cook food on the Space Station and includes ox-tongue from his home-region prepared by Thierry Marx, chicken-supreme and for desert, apple gingerbread.

    Connect with Thomas Pesquet on social media:
    http://thomaspesquet.esa.int

  • Fly Your Satellite! programme overview

    2016-12-20 12:15:05Fly Your Satellite! programme overview

    ‚€úFly your Satellite‚€Ě is an ESA educational initiative whose focus is to have university students working directly on a satellite and participating in most of its phases from design to launch and operations on orbit. University students now can apply for a new edition of the Fly Your Satellite! programme. Deadline for applications is 5 March 2017.

    You can read more detail:
    http://www.esa.int/Education/CubeSats_-_Fly_Your_Satellite

  • Highlights 2016

    2016-12-19 16:45:56Highlights 2016

    2016 has been an incredible year for the European Space Agency, ESA. With astronauts visiting the ISS, Galileo deployment going at full speed and initial services declared. Or pioneering missions such as ExoMars. ESA is once again proving it is at the forefront of cutting edge technology and that its missions are an enrichment for the whole of humanity.

  • Earth from Space: Seville

    2016-12-16 10:04:04Earth from Space: Seville

    Earth from Space is presented by Kelsea Brennan-Wessels from the ESA Web-TV virtual studios. Explore the Spanish city of Seville and its surroundings in the 210th edition.

    See also http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2016/12/Seville_Spain to download the image.

  • Galileo Initial Services

    2016-12-15 15:57:04Galileo Initial Services

    Galileo, the European global satellite navigation system, is ready to be used.

    With 18 Galileo satellites in orbit, supporting ground infrastructure, and after an extensive testing period, Galileo Initial Services are now available for public authorities, businesses and citizens. From now on, users around the world can be guided using the positioning, navigation and timing information provided by Galileo‚€ôs global satellite constellation.

    The Declaration of Galileo Initial Services by the European Commission is the first step towards reaching Full Operational Capability. The Initial Services offered by Galileo include the Open Service, the Public Regulated Service (PRS) and the Search and Rescue Service (SAR). The full and complete portfolio of Galileo services will be available by 2020, when the satellite constellation and ground infrastructure are complete.

    Galileo Initial Services are a result of cooperation between the European Commission, European GNSS Agency (GSA), and European Space Agency (ESA).

    This video explains what made these initial services possible. It includes an animation showing where these services will be available and an interview with Paul Verhoef, Director of Navigation Programmes at ESA.

    Read more about Galileo Initial Services:
    http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Navigation/Galileo_begins_serving_the_globe

  • Galileo coverage

    2016-12-15 11:31:05Galileo coverage

    Europe‚€ôs Galileo satellite navigation system has entered its initial operational phase, offering positioning, velocity and timing services to suitably equipped users worldwide. It takes a minimum of four Galileo satellites to be visible in the local sky to fix a receiver‚€ôs position. This animation shows how service availability increases as the overall number of satellites in the Galileo constellation goes up.

    Read more about Galileo Initial Services:
    http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Navigation/Galileo_begins_serving_the_globe

  • ExoMars first year in orbit

    2016-12-14 16:05:37ExoMars first year in orbit

    An overview animation of the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter‚€ôs expected path around Mars between October 2016 and December 2017.

    The spacecraft entered orbit on 19 October 2016, on a highly elliptical path that took it between about 250 km and 98 000 km from the planet in about 4.2 days.

    The main science mission is intended to take place from a near-circular 400 km orbit, starting in early 2018. The spacecraft will achieve this orbit by aerobraking ‚€ď using the planet‚€ôs atmosphere to slow down gradually.First, on 19 January 2017, the angle of the orbit will be changed to 74¬ļ with respect to the equator, so that science observations can cover most of the planet.

    Next, to get into an aerobraking orbit, the craft will fire its thrusters in early February to reach 200 x 33 475 km, which will also reduce its orbital period to 24 hours.

    Aerobraking is planned to begin on 15 March, with a series of seven manoeuvres ‚€ď about one every three days ‚€ď that will steadily lower the craft‚€ôs altitude at its point of closest approach, from 200 km to about 114 km. Then the atmosphere will take over, gradually reducing the most distant part of the orbit.

    Final manoeuvres are expected at the end of 2017 to circularise the orbit at an altitude of about 400 km, whereupon the science mission can begin.

    The animation is based on data available as of end-2016, but the actual timing of the various manoeuvres may be subject to change as operational plans develop during 2017.

    More about ExoMars:
    http://www.esa.int/exomars

  • Thomas Pesquet‚€ôs space bedroom (French)

    2016-12-13 17:04:32Thomas Pesquet‚€ôs space bedroom (French)

    ESA astronaut Thomas Pesquet gives a guided tour of the International Space Station‚€ôs crew quarters ‚€ď the bedrooms and only private areas for the six astronauts in the outpost.

    After a day‚€ôs work running experiments and maintaining the weightless research centre astronauts can retreat to their private quarters that is no larger than a changing room. In this small space they can store personal items, use a laptop for internet and float to sleep in their sleeping bag.

    Find out more about the Proxima mission here: http://www.esa.int/proxima

    Connect with Thomas via http://thomaspesquet.esa.int

  • ExoMars - A promising future

    2016-12-13 09:35:41ExoMars - A promising future

    2016 has been an eventful and promising year for ESA‚€ôs ExoMars mission. After successfully placing the Trace Gas Orbiter into Mars‚€ô orbit on 19 October, the orbiter has sent back its first images, tested its instruments and performed in orbit calibration measurements and health checks.

    The Schiaparelli lander collected almost all of its expected data before its unexpected crash landing on the Martian surface. Crucial lessons will be learnt from this for the recently approved 2020 ExoMars mission, which will put Europe‚€ôs first rover on Mars.

    The precise cause of the lander loss is still being investigated but preliminary technical investigations have found that the atmospheric entry and slowing down in the early phases went exactly as planned.

    In all, since its launch in March 2016, the ExoMars mission has been a mixture of successes and one unexpected set back. Looking ahead, the Trace Gas Orbiter will start aerobraking in March 2017 to gradually slow down over the following months. By the end of 2017, the orbiter will be in a lower, near circular orbit of 400 kms and ExoMars‚€ô primary science mission can begin.

    More about ExoMars:
    http://www.esa.int/exomars

  • Paxi - Il Sistema Solare

    2015-08-19 13:29:48Paxi - Il Sistema Solare

    Rejoignez Paxi pour un voyage √† travers notre syst√®me solaire, des plan√®tes rocheuses les plus internes les plus proches du Soleil, en passant par des plan√®tes g√©antes jusqu'aux fronti√®res glac√©es d'o√Ļ proviennent les com√®tes.



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  • Creation : Thursday 28 august 2008
  • Publish : Monday 01 february 2021

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